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Cool Logos, Bowie Quotes, and Creating a Unique Brand: Marketing Rebel Becky Mickletz of Remickz Marketing

Cool Logos, Bowie Quotes, and Creating a Unique Brand: Marketing Rebel Becky Mickletz of Remickz Marketing

By Jahla Seppanen (click for more…)

Photos by Tye Idleman, FL+G Agency (click for more…)

Cover photo, Mickletz own (click for more…)

Panel hosted by FL+G Agency for Denver Design Week (click for more…)

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We live in a world of marketing. Of logos and slogans and purposefully selected fonts, catch phrases, and strategic aesthetics… and most of it is phony, fast, and passion-less. Still, it seems no matter where you look, people are trying to stake their flag in a square of visibility and shout their sales pitch like a ‘come one, come all’ plea.

In such a saturated, cookie-cutter marketing climate, how does one establish a unique brand? This was the question at hand during Denver Design Week’s 2018 experts panel, “More Than a Logo.” Led by presenter Becky Mickletz of Remickz Marketing (who helped design the smart logo for Denver Design Week), the panel included Brandy Sachen of SoFar Sounds Denver, Brian Rogers of FL+G creative ad agency, and Josh Taylor of SIXINCH North America. Together they confronted the challenges of branding success, staying true to oneself and honoring the founding creative vision, and ultimately how to make a brand unique. FLORA | | FAUNA was front-row for the talk and caught up with Mickletz after the panel to dig deeper into these questions.

Hint: finding your own marketing voice and working for quality instead of quantity is the trick to personal and professional marketing success.

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FF: How did you discover your marketing 'voice'?

BM: I am less traditional compared to most in content. I curse a bit and stay real to how I am feeling as a business owner; which isn't always people's cup of tea (or whiskey). However, I noticed that the more I stayed true to my voice, the more clients I get that fit better with me. Writing in my own voice was tough at first, but when I would talk to people, it came with more ease. So I started to record myself when talking to a friend or family member and listened back to hear how I talked about my business in a less scripted, more raw way.

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FF: What are your guiding principles to stay true to yourself and work only with brands you align with?

BM: Going from a work environment where you worked eight days a week to a city that values community and balance (hey, Denver!), I quickly learned what means the most to me, my business, and my relationships. Finding people that believe in working together towards something better is huge for me. Rather than "what can YOU do for me?" it becomes "what can WE create together that is going to be kickass for people?" Additionally, finding those that believe in work/life balance. I know within the first five minutes of talking to someone if I want to work with them. A big part of branding is trusting the process and not focusing on what everyone is doing, but rather what is going to make it uniquely you.

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FF: Sounds like you’re a daredevil in a profession of play-it-safers?

BM: There is an amazing David Bowie quote that we should all get tattooed, "Never play to the gallery.” Never work for other people in what you do, and always remember the reason you initially started.

FF: How do you remain true to your voice as you and your business evolve?

BM: Like a fine wine, I think my voice has matured in the best way possible. Because the Internet world can be sensitive, I had to start paying attention to how my voice could be heard from many perspectives and not just my own. You start to walk a fine line at times. My biggest struggle came when I was selling things outside my traditional service (ie: posters, workshops). I immediately went into car sales(wo)man mode because that is what was engrained in my head from media. As soon as I notice myself sounding robotic, I step away. Usually a night's sleep, talking to a friend, working on client projects, or a glass of whiskey will do the trick in getting me back to my true voice.

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FF: Your work is a successful example of quality over quantity. How do you survive in marking without selling out to quantity?

BM: When I first started ten years ago, I did a lot of logos. And they were quick. It wasn't until I worked with a branding company for events that I learned the importance of people's WHY. I started taking the design I created and making it tangible. I saw the emotion it evoked and that was a game-changer. Because a lot of my work involves social media, it quickly becomes my worst enemy. Taking time away from it and going back to my roots, like old typography books and old labels, for inspiration helps with the balance of digital vs. old school worlds.

FF: What makes a cool logo?

BM: I think it is really easy for people to want a "cool" logo quick. I focus on understanding the business owner, their goals, and what sets them apart before even touching my design programs.

 Photo by Becky Mickletz, Instagram

Photo by Becky Mickletz, Instagram

JOIN US: Mickletz holds weekend 9-5 workshops called “Now Featuring…” that focus on honing your business and branding. A MUST for Denver business owners and young marketers. The next event takes place November 3, where experts from various fields including SEO, photography, finance, contracts, and project management lead participants through hands-on learning to better develop your company and brand. Bonus: make real-life connections with fellow entrepreneurs and 303 creatives. 
CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS!
By Jahla Seppanen (click for more…)
Photos by Tye Idleman, FL+G Agency (click for more…)
Cover photo, Mickletz own (click for more…)
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